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You are here: Pics  >  Farrah Fawcett Pics (311 pics of Farrah Fawcett)

Farrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah Fawcett  and Ryan OFarrah Fawcett  and Lee MajorsFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah FawcettFarrah Fawcett

Farrah Fawcett Pics

Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett
Farrah Fawcett

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Farrah Fawcett Snapshot


First Name
Farrah

Last Name
Fawcett

Birthday
1947-02-02

Height
66.5

Build
Slim

Eye Color
Blue

Hair Color
Blonde

Birthplace
Corpus Christi, Texas, USA

Zodiac Sign
Aquarius

Ethnicity
White

Religion
Roman Catholic

Claim to Fame
Charlie's Angels

Died
2009-06-25

Cause of Death
Anal cancer

Place of Death
Santa Monica, California, USA

Nationality
American

Gender
Female

Film Role
Actor/Actress, Producer, Soundtrack

Has Detailed Data (New)
1

Profile Bio Text
Farrah Leni Fawcett (February 2, 1947 - June 25, 2009) was an American actress. A multiple Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominee, Fawcett shot to international fame in 1976 due in part to her role as private investigator Jill Munroe in the TV series Charlie's Angels. Fawcett went on to become a critically acclaimed actress, appearing off-Broadway and in highly rated television movies in roles often challenging (The Burning Bed, Nazi Hunter: The Beate Klarsfeld Story, Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story, Margaret Bourke-White) and sometimes unsympathetic (Small Sacrifices). Fawcett was also a pop culture figure whose hairstyle was emulated by millions of young women and whose poster sales broke records, making her an international sex symbol in the 1970s and 1980s. Farrah Fawcett was born in Corpus Christi, Texas, to Pauline Alice (née Evans), a homemaker, and James William Fawcett, an oil field contractor. She was of French, English, and Choctaw Native American ancestry. Fawcett has said that her first name was "made up" by her mother because it went well with her last name. A Roman Catholic, Fawcett's education was at the parish school of the church her family attended, St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in Corpus Christi, Texas. She graduated from W.B. Ray High School in Corpus Christi in 1965. From 1966–1969, Fawcett attended the University of Texas at Austin and became a sister of Delta Delta Delta Sorority. She appeared in a photo of the "Ten Most Beautiful Coeds" from the university, which ran in Cashbox magazine. A Hollywood publicist saw the photo, called Farrah and urged her to move to Los Angeles, which she did in 1969, leaving after her junior year with her parents' permission to "try her luck" in Hollywood.

Couple Profile Source
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farrah_Fawcett

High School
W. B. Ray High School, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA (1965)

University
University of Texas at Austin (1966-67, dropout)

Full Name at Birth
Mary Farrah Leni Fawcett

Occupation Text
Actress, Author, Artist

Father
James William Fawcett

Mother
Pauline Alice Evans Fawcett

Associated People
George Vreeland Hill

Age
62

Wikipedia Text

Farrah Fawcett (born Ferrah Leni Fawcett; February 2, 1947 – June 25, 2009) was an American actress, model, and artist. A four-time Emmy Award nominee and six-time Golden Globe Award nominee, Fawcett rose to international fame when she posed for her iconic red swimsuit poster – which became the best selling pin-up poster in history – and starred as private investigator Jill Munroe in the first season of the television series Charlie's Angels (1976–1977). In 1996, she was ranked No. 26 on TV Guide"50 Greatest TV stars of All-Time".


Bust (inches)
34

Waist (inches)
24

Hips (inches)
33

Cup Size
B

Shoe Size
7

Favorite Places
Hollywood

Favorite Colors
Pink

Year(s) Active
1969–2009

Distinctive Feature
Hair, Eyes, Smile

Wiki Bio Text
==Farrah Fawcett== (born Ferrah Leni Fawcett; February 2, 1947 – June 25, 2009) was an American actress and artist. A four-time [[Emmy Award]] nominee and six-time [[Golden Globe]] Award nominee, Fawcett rose to international fame when she posed for her iconic red swimsuit poster – which became the best selling pin-up poster in history – and starred as private investigator [[Jill Munroe]] in the first season of the television series Charlie's Angels (1976–1977). In 1996, she was ranked No. 26 on TV Guide's "50 Greatest TV stars of All-Time". Fawcett began her career in 1968 in commercials and guest roles on television. During the 1970s, she appeared in numerous television series, including recurring roles on Harry O (1974–1976), and The Six Million Dollar Man (1974–1978) with then husband, film and television star Lee Majors. Her breakthrough role came in 1976, when she was cast as Jill Munroe in the ABC series Charlie's Angels, alongside Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith. The show propelled all three to stardom, but especially Fawcett (then billed as Farrah Fawcett-Majors). After appearing in only the first season, Fawcett decided to leave the show which led to legal disputes. Eventually she signed a contract requiring her to make six guest appearances in the show's third and fourth seasons (1978–1980). For her role in Charlie's Angels she received her first Golden Globe nomination. In 1983, Fawcett received positive reviews for her performance in the Off-Broadway play Extremities. She was subsequently cast in the 1986 film version and received a Golden Globe nomination. She received two Emmy Award nominations for her roles in TV movies, as a battered wife in the 1984 film The Burning Bed and as real-life murderer Diane Downs in the 1989 film Small Sacrifices. Her 1980s work in TV movies also earned her four additional Golden Globe nominations. In 1997, she gained some negative press for a rambling appearance on The Late Show with David Letterman, but also garnered strong reviews for her role in the film The Apostle with Robert Duvall. She continued in numerous TV series, including recurring roles in the sitcom Spin City (2001) and the drama The Guardian (2002–2003). For the latter, she received her third Emmy nomination. Her film roles include, Love Is a Funny Thing (1969), Myra Breckinridge (1970), Logan's Run (1976), Sunburn (1979), Saturn 3 (1980), The Cannonball Run (1981), Extremities (1986), The Apostle (1997), and Dr. T & the Women (2000). Fawcett was diagnosed with anal cancer in 2006; the 2009 NBC documentary Farrah's Story chronicled her battle with the disease. She posthumously earned her fourth Emmy nomination for her work as a producer on the documentary. ===Early life=== Fawcett was born in Corpus Christi, Texas, the younger of two daughters. Her mother, Pauline Alice Fawcett (née Evans; January 30, 1914 – March 4, 2005), was a homemaker, and her father, James William Fawcett (October 14, 1917 – August 23, 2010), was an oil field contractor. Her elder sister was Diane Fawcett Walls (October 27, 1938 – October 16, 2001), a graphic artist. She was of Irish, French, English and Choctaw Native American ancestry. Fawcett once said the name "Farrah" was "made up" by her mother because it went well with their last name. Another theory is that her father, an oilman, reportedly named her "Farah" after the Arabic word for "joy", and she reportedly asked to change the spelling to "Farrah". A Roman Catholic, Fawcett's early education was at the parish school of the church her family attended, St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in Corpus Christi. She graduated from W. B. Ray High School in Corpus Christi, where she was voted "most beautiful" by her classmates her freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years of high school. For three years (1965–68), she attended the University of Texas at Austin, studying art. She lived at Madison House on 22nd street, west of campus. During her freshman year, she was named one of the "ten most beautiful coeds on campus", the first time a freshman had been chosen. Their photos were sent to various agencies in Hollywood. David Mirisch, a Hollywood agent, called her and urged her to come to Los Angeles. She turned him down, but he called her for the next two years. Finally, in 1968, the summer following her junior year, with her parents' permission to "try her luck" in Hollywood, Fawcett moved to Hollywood. ===Career=== ===Early career=== Fawcett (left) with Cher on The Sonny & Cher Show in 1976 Upon arriving in Hollywood in 1968, Fawcett was signed to a $350-a-week contract with Screen Gems. She began to appear in commercials for such products as Noxzema, Max Factor, Mercury Cougar automobiles, and Beautyrest mattresses, among others. Her earliest acting appearances were guest spots on The Flying Nun (1969) and I Dream of Jeannie (1969–70). She made numerous other TV appearances, including Getting Together, Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, Mayberry R.F.D., and The Partridge Family. She appeared in four episodes of The Six Million Dollar Man with husband Lee Majors, on The Dating Game and S.W.A.T, and had a recurring role on Harry O alongside David Janssen as the title character's girlfriend, Sue. She had a sizable part in the 1969 French romantic-drama Love Is a Funny Thing. She played the role of Mary Ann Pringle in Myra Breckinridge (1970). ===Rise to stardom=== In 1976, after Pro Arts Inc. pitched the idea of a poster of Fawcett to her agent, a photo shoot was arranged with photographer Bruce McBroom, who was hired by the poster company. According to friend Nels Van Patten, Fawcett styled her own hair and did her makeup without the aid of a mirror. Her blonde highlights were further heightened by a squeeze of lemon juice. From 40 rolls of film, Fawcett herself selected her six favorite pictures, and eventually the choice was narrowed to the one that made her famous. The resulting poster, of Fawcett in a one-piece red bathing suit, is the best-selling poster in history. Fawcett's iconic poster that sold a record-breaking 20 million copies Due to the popularity of her poster, Fawcett earned a supporting role in Michael Anderson's science-fiction film Logan's Run (1976) with Michael York. She and her husband, television star Lee Majors, were frequent tennis partners with producer Aaron Spelling. Spelling and his business partner eventually chose Fawcett to play Jill Munroe in their upcoming made-for-TV movie, Charlie's Angels, a movie of the week which aired on March 21, 1976, on ABC. The movie starred Fawcett (then billed as Farrah Fawcett-Majors), Kate Jackson, and Jaclyn Smith as private investigators for Townsend Associates, a detective agency run by a reclusive multimillionaire whom the women had never met. Voiced by John Forsythe, the Charles Townsend character presented cases and dispensed advice via a speakerphone to his core team of three female employees, whom he referred to as "Angels". They were aided in the office and occasionally in the field by two male associates, played by character actors David Doyle and David Ogden Stiers. The program quickly earned a huge following, leading the network to air it a second time and approve production for a series, with the pilot's principal cast minus Ogden Stiers.[citation needed] The Charlie's Angels series formally debuted on September 22, 1976. Each of the three actresses was propelled to stardom, but Fawcett dominated popularity polls and was soon proclaimed a phenomenon. She subsequently won a People's Choice Award for Favorite Performer in a New TV Program. In a 1977 interview with TV Guide, she said, "When the show was number three, I thought it was our acting. When we got to be number one, I decided it could only be because none of us wears a bra." Fawcett's appearance in the television show boosted sales of her poster, and she earned far more in royalties from poster sales than from her salary for appearing in Charlie's Angels. Her hairstyle went on to become an international trend, with women sporting a "Farrah-do", a "Farrah-flip", or simply "Farrah hair". Iterations of her hair style predominated among American women's hairstyles well into the 1980s. Fawcett left Charlie's Angels after only one season in the spring of 1977. After a series of legal battles over her contract with ABC, Cheryl Ladd eventually succeeded her on the show, portraying Jill Munroe's younger sister Kris Munroe. Numerous explanations for Fawcett's precipitous withdrawal from the show were offered over the years. Because her husband, Lee Majors, was the star of an established television show himself (ABC's Six Million Dollar Man which aired from 1974 to 1978), the strain on her marriage due to filming schedules that kept them apart for long periods was frequently cited, but her ambition to broaden her acting abilities in films has also been given as an explanation. She never officially signed her series contract with Spelling owing to protracted negotiations over royalties from her image's use in peripheral products, which led to an even more protracted lawsuit filed by Spelling and his company when she quit the show. As a result of leaving her contract four years early, she reluctantly signed a new contract with ABC stating that she would make six guest appearances on the series over a two-year period (1978–80). Charlie's Angels was a major success throughout the world, maintaining its appeal in syndication and spawning (particularly in the show's first three seasons) a cottage industry of peripheral products, including several series of bubble gum cards, two sets of fashion dolls, numerous posters, puzzles, and school supplies, novelizations of episodes, toy vans, and a board game, all featuring Fawcett's likeness. The "Angels" also appeared on the covers of magazines around the world, from countless fan magazines to TV Guide (four times) to Time Magazine. In 2004, the television movie Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Charlie's Angels dramatized the events from the show, with supermodel and actress Tricia Helfer portraying Fawcett and Ben Browder portraying Lee Majors, Fawcett's then husband. ===Dramatic roles=== In 1980, Fawcett starred in Stanley Donen's science-fiction film Saturn 3 with Kirk Douglas, though the film earned unfavorable reviews from critics and poor box office sales. The following year she starred alongside an ensemble cast, which included Burt Reynolds, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis, Jr., in the comedy The Cannonball Run (1981). Later that year, she co-starred with Katharine Ross, Sam Elliott, and Andy Griffith in the television movie Murder in Texas. In 1983, Fawcett won critical acclaim for her role in the Off-Broadway stage production of the controversial play Extremities, written by William Mastrosimone. Replacing Susan Sarandon, she played an attempted rape victim who turns the tables on her attacker. She described the role as "the most grueling, the most intense, the most physically demanding and emotionally exhausting" of her career. During one performance, a stalker in the audience disrupted the show by asking Fawcett if she had received the photos and letters he had mailed her. Police removed the man and were able only to issue a summons for disorderly conduct. The following year, her role as battered wife Francine Hughes in the fact-based television movie The Burning Bed (1984) earned her the first of her four Emmy Award nominations. The project is noted as being the first television movie to provide a nationwide 800 number that offered help for others in the situation, in this case victims of domestic abuse. It was the highest-rated television movie of the season. In 1986, Fawcett appeared in the movie version of Extremities, which was also well received by critics and performed well financially. For her performance she received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama. (At the time there was even talk and buzz about the possibility of her receiving an Oscar nomination for her role in the film.) She appeared in Jon Avnet's Between Two Women with Colleen Dewhurst, and took several more dramatic roles as infamous or renowned women. She was nominated for Golden Globe awards for roles as Beate Klarsfeld in Nazi Hunter: The Beate Klarsfeld Story and troubled Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton in Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story, and won a CableACE Award for her 1989 portrayal of groundbreaking LIFE magazine photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White in Double Exposure: The Story of Margaret Bourke-White. Her 1989 portrayal of convicted murderer Diane Downs in the miniseries Small Sacrifices earned her a second Emmy nomination and her sixth Golden Globe Award nomination. The miniseries won a Peabody Award for excellence in television, with Fawcett's performance singled out by the organization, which stated "Ms. Fawcett brings a sense of realism rarely seen in television miniseries (to) a drama of unusual power". ===Art meets life=== Fawcett, who had steadfastly resisted appearing nude in magazines throughout the 1970s and 1980s (although she briefly appeared topless in the 1980 film Saturn 3), caused a major stir by posing semi-nude in the December 1995 issue of Playboy. At the age of 50, she returned to Playboy with a pictorial for the July 1997 issue, which also became a top seller. The issue and its accompanying video featured Fawcett painting on canvas using her body, which had been an ambition of hers for years. That same year, Fawcett was chosen by Robert Duvall to play his wife in an independent feature film he was producing, The Apostle. She received an Independent Spirit Award nomination as Best Actress for the film, which was highly critically acclaimed. In 2000, she worked with director Robert Altman and an all-star cast in the feature film Dr. T & the Women, playing the wife of Richard Gere (her character has a mental breakdown, leading to her first fully nude appearance). Christopher Ciccone, Madonna's brother, describes befriending Fawcett around this time, and giving her a studio visit for her abstract paintings and sculpture. In 2000, Fawcett's collaboration with sculptor Keith Edmier was exhibited at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, later travelling to The Andy Warhol Museum. The sculpture was also presented in a series of photographs and a book by Rizzoli. In November 2003, Fawcett prepared for her return to Broadway in a production of Bobbi Boland, the tragicomic tale of a former Miss Florida. However, the show never officially opened, closing during preview performances. Fawcett was described as "vibrating with frustration" at the producer's extraordinary decision to cancel the production. Only days earlier the same producer closed an Off-Broadway show she had been backing. Fawcett continued to work in television, with well-regarded appearances in made-for-television movies and on popular television series including Ally McBeal and four episodes each of Spin City and The Guardian. Her work on the latter show earned her a third Emmy nomination in 2004. ===Personal life=== Fawcett began dating Lee Majors in the late 1960s. Fawcett was married to Majors from 1973 to 1982, although the couple separated in 1979. During her marriage, she was known and credited in her roles as Farrah Fawcett-Majors. From 1979 until 1997, Fawcett was involved romantically with actor Ryan O'Neal. The relationship produced a son, Redmond James Fawcett-O'Neal, born January 30, 1985, in Los Angeles. In April 2009, on probation for driving under the influence, Redmond was arrested for possession of narcotics while Fawcett was in the hospital. On June 22, 2009, The Los Angeles Times and Reuters reported that Ryan O'Neal had said that Fawcett had agreed to marry him as soon as she felt strong enough. From 1997 to 1998, Fawcett had a relationship with Canadian filmmaker James Orr, writer and producer of the Disney feature film in which she co-starred with Chevy Chase and Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Man of the House. The relationship ended when Orr was charged with and later convicted of beating Fawcett during a 1998 fight between the two. On June 5, 1997, Fawcett received negative commentary after giving a rambling interview and appearing distracted on Late Show with David Letterman. Months later, she told the host of The Howard Stern Show her behavior was just her way of joking around with the television host, partly in the guise of promoting her Playboy pictorial and video, explaining what appeared to be random looks across the theater was just her looking and reacting to fans in the audience.[citation needed] Though the Letterman appearance spawned speculation and several jokes at her expense, she returned to the show in 1999. Several years later in February 2009, Letterman ended an incoherent and largely unresponsive interview with Joaquin Phoenix by saying, "We owe an apology to Farrah Fawcett." Fawcett's elder sister, Diane Fawcett Walls, died from lung cancer just before her 63rd birthday, on October 16, 2001. The fifth episode of her 2005 Chasing Farrah series followed the actress home to Texas to visit with her father, James, and mother, Pauline. Pauline Fawcett died soon after her daughter, on March 4, 2005, at the age of 91. ===Cancer=== Fawcett with Craig J. Nevius, the director of Chasing Farrah and Farrah's Story, in 2008 Fawcett was diagnosed with anal cancer in 2006 and began treatment, including chemotherapy and surgery. Four months later, on her 60th birthday, the Associated Press reported that Fawcett was, at that point, cancer-free. However, in May 2007, Fawcett experienced a recurrence and was diagnosed with stage IV cancer that had metastasized to her liver (which has a 5-year survival rate of <20%); a malignant polyp was found where she had been treated for the initial cancer. Doctors contemplated whether to implant a radiation seeder (which differs from conventional radiation and is used to treat other types of cancer). Fawcett's U.S. doctors told her that she would require a colostomy. Not wanting to proceed with a colostomy for treatment of her stage IV cancer, she traveled to Germany for treatments described variously in the press as "holistic", "aggressive", and "alternative". There, Dr. Ursula Jacob prescribed a treatment including surgery to remove the anal tumor, a course of perfusion and embolization for her liver cancer by Doctors Claus Kiehling and Thomas Vogl in Germany, and chemotherapy back in Los Angeles. Although initially the tumors were regressing, their reappearance a few months later necessitated a new course, this time including laser ablation therapy and chemoembolization. Aided by friend Alana Stewart, Fawcett documented her battle with the disease. In early April 2009, Fawcett, back in the United States, was hospitalized, with media reports declaring her unconscious and in critical condition, although subsequent reports indicated her condition was not so dire. On April 6, the Associated Press reported that her cancer had metastasized to her liver, a development Fawcett had learned of in May 2007 and which her subsequent treatments in Germany had targeted. The report denied that she was unconscious and explained that the hospitalization was due not to her cancer but a painful abdominal hematoma that had been the result of a minor procedure. Her spokesperson emphasized she was not "at death's door", adding "She remains in good spirits with her usual sense of humor ... She's been in great shape her whole life and has an incredible resolve and an incredible resilience." Fawcett was released from the hospital on April 9, picked up by longtime companion O'Neal, and, according to her doctor, was "walking and in great spirits and looking forward to celebrating Easter at home." A month later, on May 7, Fawcett was reported as critically ill, with Ryan O'Neal quoted as saying she now spends her days at home, on an IV and often asleep. The Los Angeles Times reported she was in the last stages of her cancer and had the chance to see her son Redmond in April 2009, although shackled and under supervision, as he was then incarcerated. Her 91-year-old father, James, flew out to Los Angeles to visit. The cancer specialist who was treating Fawcett in L.A., Dr. Lawrence Piro, and Fawcett's friend and Angels co-star Kate Jackson – a breast cancer survivor – appeared together on The Today Show dispelling tabloid-fueled rumors, including suggestions Fawcett had ever been in a coma, had ever reached 86 pounds, and had ever given up her fight against the disease or lost the will to live. Jackson decried such fabrications, saying they "really do hurt a human being and a person like Farrah." Piro recalled when it became necessary for Fawcett to undergo treatments that would cause her to lose her hair, acknowledging "Farrah probably has the most famous hair in the world", but also that it is not a trivial matter for any cancer patient, whose hair "affects [one's] whole sense of who [they] are". Of the documentary, Jackson averred Fawcett "didn't do this to show that 'she' is unique, she did it to show that we are all unique ... (T)his was ... meant to be a gift to others to help and inspire them." The two-hour documentary Farrah's Story, which was filmed by Fawcett and friend Alana Stewart, aired on NBC on May 15, 2009. The documentary was watched by nearly nine million people at its premiere airing, and it was re-aired on the broadcast network's cable stations MSNBC, Bravo and Oxygen. Fawcett earned her fourth Emmy nomination posthumously on July 16, 2009, as producer of Farrah's Story. Controversy surrounded the aired version of the documentary, with her initial producing partner, who had worked with her four years earlier on her reality series Chasing Farrah, alleging O'Neal's and Stewart's editing of the program was not in keeping with her wishes to more thoroughly explore rare types of cancers such as her own and alternative methods of treatment. He was especially critical of scenes showing her son visiting her, for the last time, in shackles while she was nearly unconscious in bed. She had generally kept her son out of the media, and his appearances were minimal in Chasing Farrah. ===Death=== ===Farrah Fawcett's grave=== Fawcett died at age 62 on June 25, 2009, the same day American singer Michael Jackson died, at Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, with O'Neal and Stewart by her side. A private funeral was held in Los Angeles on June 30, 2009 with her son Redmond permitted to leave his California detention center to attend the funeral, where he gave the first reading. Fawcett is buried at the Westwood Village Memorial Park in Los Angeles. News of Fawcett's death was largely overshadowed by coverage of the death of singer-songwriter Michael Jackson, which occurred a few hours later in Holmby Hills, Los Angeles. On the night of her death, ABC aired an hour-long special episode of 20/20 featuring clips from several of Barbara Walters' past interviews with Fawcett as well as new interviews with Ryan O'Neal, Jaclyn Smith, Alana Stewart, and Dr. Lawrence Piro. Walters followed up on the story on Friday's episode of 20/20. CNN's Larry King Live planned a show exclusively about Fawcett that evening until the death of Michael Jackson several hours later caused the program to shift to cover both stories. Cher, a longtime friend of Fawcett, and Suzanne de Passe, executive producer of Fawcett's Small Sacrifices mini-series, both paid tribute to Fawcett on the program. Coincidentally, de Passe worked for Motown Records in the 1960s and 70s and played a major part in the development of The Jackson 5 which included lead singer Michael Jackson. NBC aired a Dateline NBC special "Farrah Fawcett: The Life and Death of an Angel" the following evening, June 26, preceded by a rebroadcast of Farrah's Story in prime time. That weekend and the following week, television tributes continued. MSNBC aired back-to-back episodes of its Headliners and Legends episodes featuring Fawcett and Jackson. TV Land aired a mini-marathon of Charlie's Angels and Chasing Farrah episodes. E! aired Michael & Farrah: Lost Icons and The Biography Channel aired Bio Remembers: Farrah Fawcett. The documentary Farrah's Story re-aired on the Oxygen Network and MSNBC. BET aired the 2004 movie The Cookout, which Fawcett was in. Larry King said of the Fawcett phenomenon: “ TV had much more impact back in the '70s than it does today. Charlie's Angels got huge numbers every week – nothing really dominates the television landscape like that today. Maybe American Idol comes close, but now there are so many channels and so many more shows it's hard for anything to get the audience, or amount of attention, that Charlie's Angels got. She was a major TV star when the medium was clearly dominant. ” Playboy founder Hugh Hefner said "Farrah was one of the iconic beauties of our time. Her girl-next-door charm combined with stunning looks made her a star on film, TV, and the printed page." Kate Jackson said: “ She was a selfless person who loved her family and friends with all her heart, and what a big heart it was. Farrah showed immense courage and grace throughout her illness and was an inspiration to those around her... I will remember her kindness, her cutting dry wit and, of course, her beautiful smile...when you think of Farrah, remember her smiling because that is exactly how she wanted to be remembered: smiling. ” In March 2010, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences caused controversy when Fawcett was excluded from the "In Memoriam" montage at the 82nd Academy Awards ceremony, along with fellow television stars Bea Arthur, Gene Barry, and Ed McMahon. Michael Jackson, though not primarily known for his film roles, was among those memorialized in the montage, adding to the controversy. In addition to Ryan and Tatum O'Neal, friends and colleagues of Fawcett publicly expressed their outrage at the oversight, including actress Jane Fonda and film critic Roger Ebert. AMPAS executive director Bruce Davis cited Fawcett's recognition at the 61st Primetime Emmy Awards for her "remarkable television work", and said of all the exclusions: "There's nothing you can say to people, particularly to family members, within a day or two of the show that helps at all. They tend to be surprised and hurt, and we understand that and we're sorry for it." ===Cultural icon=== The red one-piece bathing suit she wore in her famous 1976 poster was donated to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH) on February 2, 2011. Said to have been purchased at a Saks Fifth Avenue store, the red Lycra suit, made by the leading Australian swimsuit company, Speedo, was donated to the Smithsonian by her executors and was formally presented to NMAH in Washington, D.C., by her longtime companion Ryan O'Neal. The suit and the poster are expected to go on temporary display sometime in 2011–12. They will be made additions to the Smithsonian's "popular culture" department. The famous poster of Farrah in a red swimsuit has been produced as a Barbie doll. The limited edition dolls, complete with a gold chain and the girl-next-door locks, were purchased by Barbie fans. In 2011, Men's Health named Fawcett in its list of the "100 Hottest Women of All-Time," ranking her at No. 31. The song "Midnight Train to Georgia" was inspired by Fawcett and Lee Majors. Songwriter Jim Weatherly phoned Majors, who was a friend, and the call was answered by Fawcett. Weatherly and Fawcett chatted briefly and she told him she was going to visit her mother and was taking "the midnight plane to Houston". Although Majors and Fawcett were both successful by that time, Weatherly used them as "characters" in his song, about a failed actress who leaves Los Angeles and is followed by her boyfriend who can’t live without her. Eventually the genders were swapped to a failed actor who leaves Los Angeles and is followed by his girlfriend who can't live without him, a train replaced the plane, and Houston was changed to Georgia. The recording by Gladys Knight & the Pips attained the number 1 position on the Billboard chart in 1973. In 1980, O'Neal facilitated a meeting between Fawcett and artist Andy Warhol, and he created two portraits of Fawcett during their time together. The portraits were later loaned by Fawcett to the Andy Warhol Museum for a temporary period. Following a 2013 court case between O'Neal and the University of Texas, which had been named by Fawcett as the recipient of all of her artwork, one of the portraits was deemed the property of O'Neal. The portrait was valued between US$800,000 and US$12 million during the hearing of the court case https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farrah_Fawcett *********************************************** Date of Birth 2 February 1947, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA Date of Death 25 June 2009, Santa Monica, California, USA (cancer) Birth Name Farrah Leni Fawcett Height 5' 6" (1.68 m) ===Mini Bio=== (1) Farrah Fawcett is a true Hollywood success story. A native of Texas, she was the daughter of Pauline Alice (Evans), a homemaker, and James Fawcett, an oil field contractor. She was a natural athlete, something that her father encouraged, and she attended a high school with a strong arts program. She attended University of Texas in Austin, graduating with a degree in Microbiology, but only wanted to be an actress. Winning a campus beauty contest got her noticed by an agent, who encouraged her to pursue acting. After graduating, she moved to Los Angeles and her healthy, all-American blond beauty was immediately noticed. She quickly got roles in various television commercials for such products as Ultra-Brite toothpaste, and Wella Balsam shampoo, and also made appearances in some TV series. In 1968, she met another Southerner, actor Lee Majors, star of the popular TV series The Big Valley (1965), on a blind date set up by their publicists. He became very taken with her and also used his own standing to promote her career. In 1969, she made her film debut in Love Is a Funny Thing (1969). The next year, she appeared in the film adaptation of the Gore Vidal bestselling novel Myra Breckinridge (1970). The shooting was very unpleasant, with much feuding on the set, and Farrah was embarrassed by the finished film, which was a major failure. But Farrah was undamaged and continued to win roles. In 1973, she and Majors married, and the following year, she won a recurring role in the crime series Harry O (1973). She had her first taste of major success when she won a supporting role in the science fiction film Logan's Run (1976). She came to the attention to the highly successful producer Aaron Spelling, who was impressed by her beauty and vivacious personality. That won her a role in the TV series Charlie's Angels (1976). She played a private investigator who works for a wealthy and mysterious businessman, along with two other glamorous female detectives, played by Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith. The show immediately became the most popular series on television, earning record ratings and a huge audience. All three actresses became very popular, but Farrah became by far the best known. She won People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Performer in a New TV program in 1977. Her lush, free-wheeling, wavy blond hair also became a phenomenon, with millions of women begging their hairstylists to give them "The Farrah," as her hairstyle was called. Fawcett was also a savvy businesswoman, and she received 10% profit from the proceeds of her famous poster in a red swimsuit. It sold millions and she became the "It Girl" of the 1970s. Fawcett was America's sweetheart and found herself on every celebrity magazine and pursued by photographers and fans. While she enjoyed the success and got along well with her co-stars (both of whom were also of Southern origin), she found the material lightweight. Also, the long hours she worked were beginning to take a toll on her marriage to Majors, who found himself eclipsed by her popularity. So the following year, when the show was at its peak, she left to pursue a movie career. Charlie's Angels producers sued her, and the studios shied away from her, and she lost out on the lead role in the hit feature film Foul Play (1978) to Goldie Hawn. Eventually, she and the Charlie's Angels producers reached a settlement, where she would make guest appearances on the series. As a result of the negative publicity and some poor script choices, her career briefly hit a slow spot. In addition, she and Majors separated in 1979. She had starring roles in Somebody Killed Her Husband (1978), Sunburn (1979), and Saturn 3 (1980) (which she did a topless scene in), but all three failed financially. She appeared in the Burt Reynolds chase comedy The Cannonball Run (1981), which was successful financially, but it was met not only with bad reviews but also with bad publicity when Farrah's stunt double Heidi Von Beltz was involved in a stunt that went horribly wrong and left her a quadriplegic. Farrah's feature film career came to a halt, and she and Majors were drifting apart. In 1981, she met Ryan O'Neal, a friend of her husband's, and they began became friends and spent a great deal of time together. He also encouraged her to go back to television and she received good reviews in the well-received miniseries "Murder in Texas" (1981). In 1982, she filed for divorce, which Majors readily agreed to. Soon, she and O'Neal were a couple and moved in together. She set on sights on becoming a serious dramatic actress. She took over for Susan Sarandon in the stage play "Extremities" where she played a rape victim who turns the tables on her rapist. That, in turn, led her to her major comeback when she starred in the searing story of a battered wife in The Burning Bed (1984), based on a true story. It garnered a very large audience, and critics gave her the best reviews she had ever received for her heartfelt performance. She was nominated for both an Emmy and Golden Globe and also became involved in helping organizations for battered women. The following year, she and O'Neal became the parents of a son, 'Redmond O'Neal'. She tried to continue her momentum with a starring role in the feature film adaptation of Extremities (1986), and while she garnered a Golden Globe nomination, the film, itself, was not a hit. She continued to seek out serious roles, appearing mainly on television. She scored success again in Small Sacrifices (1989), again based on a true crime. Portraying an unhappy woman who is so obsessed with the man she loves that she shoots her children to make herself available and disguises it as a carjacking, Farrah again won rave reviews and helped draw a large audience, and was nominated for an Emmy again. Shortly afterwards, she and O'Neal co-starred in Good Sports (1991), playing a couple who co-star in a sports news program, but O'Neil's performance was lambasted and only 9 episodes were aired. In 1995, she surprised her fans by posing for "Playboy" at the age of 48, it became the magazine's best-selling issue of that decade. Her relationship with O'Neal was deteriorating, however, and in 1997, they broke up. The breakup took a toll, and she posed for Playboy again at the age of 50. To promote it, she appeared on Late Show with David Letterman (1993) and gave a rambling interview, sparking rumors of drug use. That same year, however, she made another comeback in The Apostle (1997), playing the neglected wife of a Pentacostal preacher, played by Robert Duvall. Both stars were praised and the film became a surprise hit. She also began dating James Orr, who had directed her earlier in the feature film Man of the House (1995). An incident occurred between them in 1998, and Farrah suffered injuries. The scandal drew nationwide headlines, especially after the tabloids published photos of Farrah with her injuries. The authorities compelled Fawcett to testify against Orr in court, and he was found guilty of assault and given a minimum sentence. Embarrassed, she lowered her profile and her career lost momentum, but she continued to work in television and films. She and O'Neal also started seeing each other again when he was diagnosed with leukemia. The new millennium brought her highs and lows. In 2000, she acted with Richard Gere in Robert Altman's film Dr. T & the Women (2000). Her son Redmond has had problems with drug abuse and has been in and out of jail. In 2001, she lost her only sister to cancer. In 2004, she received her third Emmy nomination for her performance in The Guardian (2003), and she starred in her own reality show titled "Chasing Farrah" in 2005 along with Ryan O'Neal, but that ended after only 7 episodes. That same year, she was devastated when her beloved mother died. In 2006, producer Aaron Spelling died, and she famously reunited with her Charlie's Angels co-stars Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith at the Emmys in a tribute to him. She looked tan and healthy, but soon, she was diagnosed with anal cancer. She asked her friend Alana Stewart to accompany her and videotape her during her doctor's visits. Those video journals resulted in the documentary "Farrah's Story," co-executive produced by Fawcett. It aired in 2009, and viewers were shocked to see Farrah with a shaved head and in a continuous state of pain. Ryan O'Neal and Alana Stewart were constantly by her side, and her Charlie's Angels co-stars Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith also visited her, marking the final time that all three original angels appeared together on television. The documentary became a ratings success, and it earned a Emmy nomination as Outstanding Nonfiction Special. On June 25, 2009 Farrah lost her battle with cancer and passed away at aged 62. She left the bulk of her estate to her only son Redmond, and her trust fund allowed for the creation of The Farrah Fawcett Foundation, which provides funding for cancer research and prevention. Alana Stewart is the president of the Foundation and Jaclyn Smith's husband Dr. Brad Allen is one of the Board of Directors. Ryan O'Neal and Farrah's nephew Greg Walls are also on the Advisory Board, keeping alive her legacy. - IMDb Mini Biography By: anonymous ===Spouse=== (1) Lee Majors (28 July 1973 - 16 February 1982) (divorced) ===Trade Mark=== (5) (1970s-1980s) Big feathery, blonde hairstyle Sparkling blue eyes Voluptuous figure Lisp, breathless voice Her bright smile ===Trivia=== (47) Attended the University of Texas at Austin (1965-1968). Lived with Ryan O'Neal for 17 years. His daughter, actress Tatum O'Neal, disapproved of her father's relationship with Fawcett. However, when Fawcett passed away, Tatum had only good things to say about her. On January 28, 1998, her boyfriend, writer-director-producer James Orr, was convicted of misdemeanor battery after attacking her for supposedly refusing his marriage proposal. Actress Kristen Amber Citron accused her of stealing $72,000 worth of clothing and nude pictures from the home of former boyfriend James Orr. [May 1997] Reported to be separating from Ryan O'Neal after 17 years together. [February 1997] Mother of Redmond O'Neal. Ex-stepmother of Lee Majors II. One of the original Charlie's Angels. She left after only one season of Charlie's Angels (1976) which resulted in a lawsuit. She was replaced by Cheryl Ladd, who played her sister. However, the lawsuit resulted in a settlement, where she agreed to make guest appearances, which meant that she had to act with her replacement. Ladd said that Fawcett was very professional to her, in spite of the awkwardness. Listed (as Farrah Fawcett-Majors) as one of 12 "Promising New Actors of 1976" in John Willis' Screen World, Vol. 28. On July 25, 1980, she had a rather strange opening night in "Butterflies Are Free" at the Burt Reynolds Dinner Theatre in Jupiter, Florida. An obese lady in the front row of tables began shouting insults at her and making bird calls during the performance. Later, this unidentified woman raised her dress and flashed the performers, causing co-star Dennis Christopher to take notice, although the character he was playing was a blind man. Nearby, a male patron began vomiting and, then, yet another patron fainted. Incredibly, the reviews for Farrah's performance were positive. Goldie Hawn replaced Farrah in Foul Play (1978), because of the lawsuit brought by "Charlie's Angels" producers who had prevented her from acting in it. Years later, she took over for Hawn who dropped out of Dr. T & the Women (2000). In the late 1970s, she and her husband Lee Majors formed Fawcett-Majors Productions. Despite sometimes bizarre behavior, including an incident on Late Show with David Letterman (1993), that has led to claims she is a drug addict, she says that she never uses drugs. She claims she gets giggly when she is nervous. She went on Letterman unprepared, she said, and her nervousness affected her behavior. Was offered a cameo in the film version of Charlie's Angels (2000). Negotiations fell through after Fawcett insisted on being cast as the voice of the new Charlie. Attended and graduated from W.B. Ray High School in Corpus Christi, Texas (1965). Her classmates voted her "most beautiful". Inducted into the Texas Film Hall of Fame (by Dabney Coleman) for her legendary status on screen and off screen (2003). Was actively involved in charity work with the Cancer Society, in addition to her work against domestic violence. During her ongoing advocacy for this cause, she had participated in events such as the Humanitarian Awards in Media, anti-domestic violence panel discussions produced by Show Coalition, and had served as a board member of the National Advisory Council for the National Domestic Violence Hotline, the most effective and leading non-profit organization in America benefiting the victims of domestic violence. Parents are James Fawcett and Pauline Fawcett (who passed away on March 4, 2005). Was originally a Microbiology major in college until changing her major to Art in her sophomore year. Was neighbors with Tori Spelling and Aaron Spelling for 10 years. She attended Rodney Dangerfield's memorial at which she held a Native American butterfly release ceremony and is sculpting a bronze life-size statue of Rodney to be placed in Pierce Brothers Memorial Park. Filmed an episode of Chasing Farrah (2005) at her parents' home in Houston. Revealed she was battling cancer of the intestine and was undergoing radiation treatment. [October 2006] Cousin of Jan Fawcett and younger sister of Diane Fawcett Walls (who passed away on October 16, 2001). Following the debut of Charlie's Angels (1976), the number of baby girls named Farrah increased dramatically in the United States. In 1977, this was the 177th most popular name. Officially declared cancer-free on February 2, 2007. Chosen by Australian men's magazine Zoo weekly as one of the "Top 50 Hottest Babes Ever". [March 2006] Early in her career, she appeared as a contestant on The Dating Game (1965). This was revealed that her cancer has returned after three months of her being cancer-free. She was having a routine check-up and a small polyp was found that turned out to be malignant and she underwent treatment again. She was to have a steel seed implanted that will emit radiation. [May 2007] Family friend Farrah Forke was named after her. Friends with Alana Stewart. She has been battling cancer for three years and recently returned from Germany, where she had experimental stem-cell treatment. Hospitalized in a Los Angeles hospital in a critical condition on April 5, 2009. Released from a Los Angeles hospital after receiving treatment for abdominal bleeding on April 9, 2009. Friends with Mela Murphy, who was also her hairdresser. Along with Ryan O'Neal and Alana Stewart, Murphy were some of the last people who were with Farrah when she died. She died on the same day as Michael Jackson. They were both in California at the time, and she died at 9:28 a.m. PDT, while he was pronounced dead at 2:26 p.m. after hours of unsuccessful resuscitation. Although she and Ryan O'Neal separated in 1997, they got back together in 2001 after he was diagnosed with leukemia. They remained a couple until her death. Received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7057 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California on February 23, 1995. She had English roots (two of her paternal great-grandparents, John Fawcett and Clara Flavel, were born in England, John in Hull, Yorkshire, and Clara in Sheffield, Yorkshire). She had unusually large nipples, which added to the popularity of her iconic poster. However, during her role on the television series Charlie's Angels (1976), the Broadcast Standards Department (censors) at ABC became very concerned about what they termed "nipple protrusion" in some of her wardrobe. Directed by four Academy Award winners: Claude Lelouch, Stanley Donen, Robert Duvall and Robert Altman. Following her death, she was interred at Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles, California. In a 1997 interview with Howard Stern, she said that her Myra Breckinridge (1970) co-star Raquel Welch was "mean-spirited". However, when Stern tried to get her to badmouth her Charlie's Angels co-stars by asking whether Kate Jackson was bitchy and whether Jaclyn Smith was dumb, she defended her friends by stating: "Kate's bitchy to some people but never bitchy to me. Jaclyn may not be intelligent to some people but she's intelligent to me.". She and her "Charlie's Angels" (1976) costar Jaclyn Smith considered it a prestigious honor when "Time" magazine wanted to put them with their other costar Kate Jackson on their November 22, 1976 cover. But the producers wanted them to give up their lunch hour to do it, and Kate balked at it. She had frequently stopped the producers from overworking them and saw this as one more way for them to encroach on their personal time. She locked herself in with her trailer with Farrah and Jaclyn and told the producers that the door was stuck and won't open. The three friends had their lunch together for 45 minutes, when the producers struggled to open the door and begged them to pose for "Time" magazine, which they did in the last 15 minutes of their lunch hour. It became one of the favorite times that the three friends shared on the show. She hadn't met Kate Jackson officially until they were both cast in "Charlie's Angels" (1976), at which time Kate told her that she had first seen her at a party when she first came to Hollywood and thought that if all girls as beautiful as her, she didn't have a chance and might as well go home to Alabama. Jaclyn Smith and Farrah had worked together before on a Max Factor commercial, and they liked each other. Kate met Jaclyn at an audition for another show, and they developed a comradery. But it was "Charlie's Angels" that put all three of them together in the same room for the first time, and they became close friends, a friendship that lasted until Farrah's death. After her death, both Kate and Jaclyn have kept Farrah's legacy alive. She was born into a Catholic family, and she and her sister attended Catholic schools. She was religious and regularly attended mass and carried rosary with her to her cancer treatments. She received last rites on her death bed and had a Catholic funeral and burial. Actress Tricia Helfer portrayed her in the TV movie Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of 'Charlie's Angels' (2004). Inducted into the Hair Fan's Hall of Fame in 2010. ===Personal Quotes=== (5) The reason that the all-American boy prefers beauty to brains is that he can see better than he can think. Marriages that last are with people who do not live in Los Angeles. God gave women intuition and femininity. Used properly, the combination easily jumbles the brain of any man I've ever met. [In a 1994 reunion with her Charlie's Angels (1976) co-stars Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith explaining to them why she left the series after only one year] Our characters were the same in every show, and we never were able to change that. Why couldn't I have been depressed on one show? Why couldn't I have cried? Once I went into executive producers Aaron Spelling and Len Goldberg and I said, "Wouldn't it be great if in one show I took Kate and Jaclyn home with me", and they met my parents, and we explored the possibilities of these girls as friends and they said, "We have a show. It works. We're not changing it." And that's when, in my heart at least, I was out of there. They didn't appreciate what we had and what was so special [In 1981, reflecting on her early acting role] On Myra Breckinridge (1970) we had to wait hours for Raquel Welch. I wasn't anybody so I stood around the set and I heard what the crew said about her. I decided I didn't want them saying those things about me. Salary (2) Charlie's Angels (1976) 5,000 (equivalent to $21,000 in 2014) Silk Hope (1999) $750,000 http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000396/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm

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